Friday, 2 December 2016

REST AND RELAXATION

OBJECT OF THE WEEK

BY: HAYLEY MAE JONES

According to John H. Falk there are five different types of museum visitors: Explorers, Facilitators, Professional/Hobbyists, Experience Seekers, and Rechargers. These visitor typologies explain why individuals are motivated to visit museums and cultural Institutions.

With the stressful holiday (and exam) period fast approaching I feel like many people fit within the "recharger" category:

“Visitors who are primarily seeking to have a contemplative, spiritual, and/or restorative experience. They see the museum as a refuge from the work-a-day world or as a confirmation of their religious beliefs”.

In order to relax and recharge here are some amazing objects/areas in Museums you should definitely check out for a little rest and relaxation!

1. The Cupola - Canada Aviation and Space Museum

The original cupola is a window on the International Space Station (ISS). This window area provides astronauts with a working space and observatory. Although the Museum only shows visitors a model, this object is still surreal in its depiction of the Earth. The area surrounding the model is semi-isolated and slightly dimmed. There are benches for visitors to sit down and relax, while classical music is played in the background. Visitors have often been caught taking power naps!

Personal Photo - Hayley Mae Jones

2. Pier and Ocean by artists François Morellet and Tadashi Kawamata. - Le Centre Pompidou


Pier and Ocean is an art installation comprising of 38 neon argon lights that are scattered around a room. The lights turn on and off in a set pattern (for a video click here). One of the second year students within the program was lucky enough to have seen the art installation in person:

"The installation limits the number of people that may enter at a time, and I was able to stand by myself for a while to really savour the experience. The lights are timed to gently dim and light to resemble ebbs and flows of the ocean, and the humming sound that the florescent tubes make are meant to make the visitor think of waves. It's also meant to pay homage to Piet Mondrian's series of sketches of the same name. I loved that it served as an interpretation of a familiar idea (the ocean/sea) in a completely foreign medium, while still retaining the "calming" sensation that many experience on the water." - Khristine, Masters of Museum Studies Student

Photo credit: source 
3. The Main Lobby - Aga Khan Museum

The Aga Khan Museum's main building is an architectural feat, incorporating relaxing light into the main lobby. The main lobby has multiple glass windows that allow for soft natural light to flood into the entrance of the building. Although it may seem like an odd place to relax, on a quiet day the main lobby is peaceful enough for some personal rest and relaxation.

Photo credit: source
Some other honourable mentions include: 

The Dream House - New York, USA 
Kadriorg Palace - Tallin, Estonia 

Hope you all enjoyed this post and have relaxing holidays! 

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